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Jia Min Yeo

Aug 05th, 2016

"Badminton is not only a physical game but also a mind game"

The young Singaporean, Jia Min Yeo clinched two titles at the Blibli.com Badminton Asia U17 & U15 Junior Championships 2015 in Kudus, Indonesia. The Singapore sports school student lived up to her top-seed billing when she defeated unseeded Indonesian Sri Fatmawati 21-15, 21-13 in the Under-17 girls' singles final.
Then, she partnered compatriot Crystal Wong Jia Ying to beat Japan's Natsu Saito and Rumi Yoshida 21-18, 21-18 to clinch the U-17 girls' doubles title.
The athlete who was born on February 1, 1999, who in 2013 became the first Singaporean to win the girls' U-15 title at the same tournament, is believed to be the first Singaporean to win the U-17 title as well.
A very young Jia Min started playing badminton in a small group but then her coach noticed that she has potential. “At the beginning, I was joining a small group but then my coach tells my parent that I have potential. With the recommendation, I start to train harder and more serious,” said Jia Min.

Jia Min said that she fell in love with badminton is because badminton is not only a physical game but also a mind game. “When we play badminton, we are not only requiring physical ability, skill and talent, but we also think about strategy. How we are going to play our game, just like chess. This is one of the reasons why I love to play badminton and I hope to become a better player,” she recalls.

After bringing home two titles, Jia Min will be playing on World Junior Championships which will be held in Lima, Peru this November. "My next competition will be the World Junior Championships and I hope to be able to go far as well. Competition will be tougher there, and I hope to play my best on every game,” she added.


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